List of Venomous Snakes Found in Each U.S. State

We recently wrote an article, the 22 species of venomous snakes in the Unites States. As the title suggests it shows the venomous snake species found in the U.S., but which species of venomous snakes can be found in each of the 50 U.S. states? Well this article is meant to answer that question. In the below list of U.S. states we’re going to tell you the species of venomous snakes found in each state.

Venomous snakes found in each U.S. state

This list of venomous snakes in each state was compiled using various sources, it is believed to be accurate but not guaranteed. If you notice any discrepancies please leave a note for us in the comments!

The 4 U.S. states that do not have any species of venomous snakes are:

  • Alaska
  • Hawaii
  • Maine
  • Rhode Island

1. Alabama

Venomous snakes in Alabama: 

  1. Carolina Pygmy Rattlesnake
  2. Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake
  3. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  4. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake
  6. Florida Cottonmouth
  7. Eastern Cottonmouth
  8. Western Cottonmouth
  9. Northern Copperhead
  10. Southern Copperhead
  11. Eastern Coral Snake

There are 11 venomous snakes in Alabama such as the Eastern Diamondback, Cottonmouths and Copperheads. These snakes are often found around people’s homes in barns, garages, gardens and yards but can also be found in more secluded or wooded areas.

2. Alaska

Venomous snakes in Alaska:

There are no species of snake in Alaska, venomous or nonvenomous.

3. Arizona

Venomous snakes in Arizona:

  1. New Mexican Ridge-nosed Rattlesnake
  2. Arizona Ridge-nosed Rattlesnake
  3. Hopi Rattlesnake
  4. Prairie Rattlesnake
  5. Sonoran Coral Snake
  6. Banded Rock Rattlesnake
  7. Colorado Desert Sidewinder
  8. Sonoran Desert Sidewinder
  9. Mojave Rattlesnake
  10. Northern Black-tailed Rattlesnake
  11. Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake
  12. Tiger Rattlesnake
  13. Western Twin-Spotted Rattlesnake
  14. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
  15. Grand Canyon Rattlesnake
  16. Desert Massasauga Rattlesnake
  17. Great Basin Rattlesnake
  18. Arizona Black Rattlesnake
  19. Mojave Desert Sidewinder

Arizona is home to 19 different species of venomous snakes, with most of these species being rattlesnakes. Most of these species are found in desert areas but Rattlesnakes are also known to be frequent visitors to golf courses and can be found out on the green.

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

4. Arkansas

Venomous snakes in Arkansas:

  1. Southern Copperhead
  2. Texas Coral Snake
  3. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake
  4. Western Cottonmouth
  5. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
  6. Timber Rattlesnake

Arkansas is home to 6 species of venomous snakes found in all four groups of venomous snakes that are found in the United States. The most likely place to encounter venomous snakes in Arkansas is in forested areas. The Copperhead and Cottonmouths are the most common, with Coral Snakes being found only rarely.

5. California

Venomous snakes in California: 

  1. Colorado Desert Sidewinder
  2. Great Basin Rattlesnake
  3. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake
  4. Mojave Rattlesnake
  5. Mojave Desert Sidewinder
  6. Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake
  7. Panamint Rattlesnake
  8. Red Diamond Rattlesnake
  9. Southern Pacific Rattlesnake
  10. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

All venomous snakes in California are Rattlesnakes. The Rattlesnakes of California can be found in a wide variety of climates and habitats like in the mountains, near the coast, in the desert, as well as in suburban areas. Western Diamondbacks are thought to be the most commonly encountered species.

6. Colorado

Venomous snakes in Colorado:

  1. Desert Massasauga
  2. Yellow Rattlesnake
  3. Prairie Rattlesnake
  4. Western Massasauga

Only four species of Rattlesnakes occur in Colorado. The most likely place to find these snakes are in desert areas and canyons. The most commonly found snake on this list is the Prairie Rattlesnake which is found all over the state.

7. Connecticut

Venomous snakes in Connecticut:

  1. Northern Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Connecticut is home to only two species of venomous snakes. Both species are rarely found, making run-ins with humans few and far between. The best place to look for these species are in forested areas or near water bodies.

8. Delaware

Venomous snakes in Delaware:

  • Northern Copperhead
  • Timber Rattlesnake

Like Connecticut, Delaware is home to only two species of venomous snakes: the Northern Copperhead and the Timber Rattlesnake. Both species are hard to find, with Northern Copperheads being somewhat more common. Copperheads can be found around waterbodies while Timber Rattlesnakes are found in wooded areas.

Copperhead

9. Florida

Venomous snakes in Florida:

  1. Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake
  2. Eastern Coral Snake
  3. Eastern Cottonmouth
  4. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  5. Florida Cottonmouth
  6. Southern Copperhead
  7. Timber Rattlesnake

For as many species of reptiles found in Florida, there are surprisingly few species of venomous snakes found there. Of these species, the Cottonmouths and Copperheads are the most common. Because it gets so hot during the day in Florida, the best time to find them is during the evening when temperatures begin to cool down.

10. Georgia

Venomous snakes in Georgia: 

  1. Carolina Pygmy Rattlesnake
  2. Eastern Coral Snake
  3. Eastern Cottonmouth
  4. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  5. Northern Copperhead
  6. Southern Copperhead
  7. Western Cottonmouth
  8. Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake
  9. Timber Rattlesnake
  10. Eastern Coral Snake

Similar to other parts of the Southeastern United States, Cottonmouths are some of the more common and widely distributed species. Cottonmouths are more resilient to human disturbed areas while the Eastern Diamondback has had decreases in their population due to human disturbance. There are 6 types of venomous snakes found in Georgia, including subspecies there are 10 total species.

11. Hawaii

Venomous snakes in Hawaii:

There are thought to be no venomous snakes in Hawaii, however there have been a few records of venomous sea snakes washing up on Hawaiian beaches, likely due to storms pushing them there.

12. Idaho

Venomous snakes in Idaho:

  1. Great Basin Rattlesnake
  2. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake
  3. Prairie Rattlesnake

The Rattlesnakes in Idaho are relatively hard to find and are not encountered often meaning that you would be lucky (or unlucky) to find one. The best place to see these snakes are in rocky areas, grasslands, and near bodies of water.

13. Illinois

Venomous snakes in Illinois:

  1. Eastern Massasauga
  2. Northern Copperhead
  3. Osage Copperhead
  4. Timber Rattlesnake
  5. Western Cottonmouth

The 5 venomous snakes of Illinois are scattered throughout the state and there isn’t one species that is particularly abundant. One major concern for venomous snakes in Illinois is the changes in habitat due to humans moving in. These snakes tend to stick to wetlands, swamps, forests, and river bluffs.

14. Indiana

Venomous snakes in Indiana: 

  1. Eastern Massasauga
  2. Northern Copperhead
  3. Timber Rattlesnake
  4. Western Cottonmouth

There are 4 venomous snakes in Indiana, none of which are particularly abundant. In fact, the Western Cottonmouth and Timber Rattlesnake are endangered at the State level, meaning that there are experiencing population declines. The Western Cottonmouth is only found in one small area in Southwest Indiana, while the other species are a bit more widespread.

15. Iowa

Venomous snakes in Iowa: 

  1. Eastern Massasauga
  2. Osage Copperhead
  3. Northern Copperhead
  4. Timber Rattlesnake
  5. Western Massasauga

In Iowa, the most common species of venomous snakes is the Timber Rattlesnake. They are found in Eastern and Southern Iowa in secluded wooded areas. The Copperhead species are the most difficult to find and may be found sometimes in Southeast Iowa.

image: Peter Paplanus | Flickr | CC BY 2.0 | Massasauga Rattlesnake

16. Kansas

Venomous snakes in Kansas:

  1. Broad-Banded Copperhead
  2. Desert Massasauga
  3. Timber Rattlesnake
  4. Prairie Rattlesnake
  5. Osage Copperhead
  6. Western Massasauga

The Copperheads are probably the most abundant species of venomous snakes in Kansas. These snakes typically prefer rural or semi-rural areas like woodlands, rocky outcrops and around water, however they have been found in people’s gardens and around homes in more rural areas.

17. Kentucky

Venomous snakes in Kentucky: 

  • Northern Copperhead
  • Southern Copperhead
  • Timber Rattlesnake
  • Western Cottonmouth
  • Western Pygmy Rattlesnake

Copperheads are the most common venomous snakes in Kentucky and are distributed throughout the entire state. Timber Rattlesnakes are also widely distributed and occur almost everywhere other than the Northern part of the state while the Western Pygmy Rattlesnake occurs only in one small area in Southwestern Kentucky.

18. Louisiana

Venomous snakes in Louisiana:

  1. Western Cottonmouth
  2. Eastern Coral Snake
  3. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake
  4. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  5. Southern Copperhead
  6. Texas Coral Snake
  7. Timber Rattle Snake

Louisiana is home to at least one species found in each of the four groups of venomous snakes found in the United States. Copperheads and Cottonmouths are the most common of the venomous snakes found in Louisiana but have slowly been disappearing from urban and suburban areas due to the disturbance. Instead, these snakes are most likely to be found in forests and wooded areas.

19. Maine

Venomous snakes in Maine:

There are no venomous snakes found in Maine. At one point in time the Timber Rattlesnake lived in the state of Maine, but it has since been extirpated.

20. Maryland

Venomous snakes in Maryland:

  1. Northern Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

The only 2 species of venomous snakes found in Maryland are the Timber Rattlesnake and the Northern Copperhead. Neither the Northern Copperhead nor Timber Rattlesnake are particularly common in Maryland. In fact, most people that claim they have seen a Copperhead have actually seen a non-venomous species that just happens to look a lot like a Copperhead. The best place to look for these snakes are in wooded areas far away from urban areas.

21. Massachusetts

Venomous snakes in Massachusetts: 

  1. Northern Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Massachusetts is home to two species of venomous snakes, however both species are very seen. It is believed that there are no more than a few hundred individuals left of either species due to a changing urbanized landscape. If you are lucky enough to see either a Copperhead or Rattlesnake, chances are it will be far away from urban areas in a forest or along rocky outcrops.

image credit: Peter Paplanus | Flickr | CC BY 2.0 | Timber Rattlesnake

22. Michigan

Venomous snakes in Michigan: 

  1. Eastern Massasauga

Michigan is home to a single species of venomous snake. Eastern Massasaugas are incredibly secretive meaning that many people may never encounter one even though they are fairly widespread throughout the state. They can be found in wetlands, prairies, and forests.

23. Minnesota

Venomous snakes in Minnesota: 

  1. Timber Rattlesnake
  2. Eastern Massasauga

The only venomous snakes to be found in Minnesota are the Timber Rattlesnake and the Eastern Massasauga. Both species are only found in small areas in the Southeastern part of the state. These snakes are very rarely seen as they tend to avoid human populated areas.

24. Mississippi

Venomous snakes in Mississippi:

  1. Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake
  2. Eastern Coral Snake
  3. Eastern Cottonmouth
  4. Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake
  5. Northern Copperhead
  6. Southern Copperhead
  7. Timber Rattlesnake
  8. Western Cottonmouth
  9. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake

Mississippi is home to as many as 9 different species of venomous snakes, but the one most commonly encountered is the Timber Rattlesnake, with Copperheads also being relatively common. These snakes are typically found in wooded areas almost all over the state.

25. Missouri

Venomous snakes in Missouri:

  1. Eastern Massasauga
  2. Northern Copperhead
  3. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake
  4. Western Cottonmouth
  5. Western Massasauga
  6. Timber Rattlesnake
  7. Osage Copperhead
  8. Southern Copperhead

Missouri is home to 8 species of venomous snakes, but the most common is thought to be the Timber Rattlesnake. Timber Rattlesnakes are found almost all over the state in Forests and rocky hillsides.

26. Montana

Venomous snakes in Montana:

  1. Prairie Rattlesnake

Montana is home to a single species of venomous snake, the Prairie Rattlesnake. These snakes can be found in most parts of the state but prefer more arid habitats. However, they can also be found in coniferous forests and along rocky outcrops.

27. Nebraska

Venomous snakes in Nebraska:

  1. Western Massasauga
  2. Timber Rattlesnake
  3. Prairie Rattlesnake
  4. Osage Copperhead

The single most widely distributed venomous snake in Nebraska is the Prairie Rattlesnake and can be found almost entirely throughout the Western half of the state. The other 3 venomous snakes found in Nebraska are found in small areas congregating around the South-Southeastern portion of the state.

28. Nevada

Venomous snakes in Nevada:

  1. Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake
  2. Panamint Speckled Rattlesnake
  3. Mojave Rattlesnake
  4. Mojave Desert Sidewinder
  5. Great Basin Rattlesnake

The Great Basin Rattlesnake can be found in almost the entirety of Nevada except for the Southern tip of the State. Interestingly, the Southern tip of the state is the only place you will find the other species on this list. These snakes are most commonly found in rocky areas in the arid Nevada climate, however the Great Basin Rattlesnake is a habitat generalist and can be found in most habitats.

image credit: Patrick Alexander | Flickr | Mojave Rattlesnake

29. New Hampshire

Venomous snakes in New Hampshire:

  1. Timber Rattlesnake

The only venomous snake found in New Hampshire is the Timber Rattlesnake, and even then, they are incredibly hard to find. There is only thought to be one small population left. The best place to find them (if you can) is in the mountainous and wooded areas of Southern New Hampshire.

30. New Jersey

Venomous snakes in New Jersey:

  1. Northern Copperhead
  2. Timber Rattlesnake

Neither of these 2 venomous snakes are particularly common in New Jersey, but the chances of encountering a Timber Rattlesnake are a little bit higher. Timber Rattlesnakes can be found along the coast in the Pine Barrens while Copperheads tend to stick to wooded areas in the Northern part of the state.

31. New Mexico

Venomous snakes in New Mexico:

  1. New Mexican Ridge-nose Rattlesnake
  2. Arizona Black Rattlesnake
  3. Sonoran Coral Snake
  4. Banded Rock Rattlesnake
  5. Desert Massasauga
  6. Mojave Rattlesnake
  7. Mottled Rock Rattlesnake
  8. Northern Black-tailed Rattlesnake
  9. Prairie Rattlesnake
  10. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

There are 10 types of venomous snakes living in the state, but the hot and dry climate of New Mexico is perfect for the many species of Rattlesnakes that live in New Mexico. New Mexico is also home to the Sonoran Coral Snake; however, these snakes are very rare and do not tend to spend much time around populated areas.

32. New York

Venomous snakes in New York:

  1. Eastern Massasauga
  2. Northern Copperhead
  3. Timber Rattlesnake

None of the venomous snakes in New York are very common. The Timber Rattlesnake has the widest distribution in the state and can be found throughout the Southeastern part of the state and with scattered population throughout the rest of the state. The Copperhead can be found along the Hudson valley and the Eastern Massasauga occurs in wetlands in only two locations.

33. North Carolina

Venomous snakes in North Carolina:

  1. Carolina Pygmy Rattlesnake
  2. Eastern Coral Snake
  3. Eastern Cottonmouth
  4. Eastern Diamondback
  5. Southern Copperhead
  6. Northern Copperhead
  7. Timber Rattlesnake

Copperheads are definitely the most commonly encountered venomous snake in North Carolina and can be found throughout the entire state. They prefer wooded areas but are also able to adapt to more human dominated spaces. Copperheads have also been found bunking with Timber Rattlesnakes during hibernation.

image: John | Flickr | CC 2.0

34. North Dakota

Venomous snakes in North Dakota:

  1. Prairie Rattlesnake

A single species of venomous snake is found in North Dakota. These snakes are typically found in the Southwestern part of North Dakota. As suggested by their name, Prairie Rattlesnakes prefer prairie and grassland habitats however they can also be found in forests.

35. Ohio

Venomous snakes in Ohio:

  1. Eastern Massasauga
  2. Northern Copperhead
  3. Timber Rattlesnake

While there are 3 species of venomous snakes in Ohio, both the Eastern Massasauga and the Timber Rattlesnake are endangered in the state of Ohio, suggesting that their populations are decreasing. The Northern Copperhead is more common than these snakes and can be found in rocky and wooded areas throughout central and Western Ohio.

36. Oklahoma

Venomous snakes in Oklahoma: 

  1. Broad Banded Copperhead
  2. Desert Massasauga
  3. Osage Copperhead
  4. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Western Massasauga
  6. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
  7. Western Cottonmouth
  8. Timber Rattlesnake
  9. Southern Copperhead
  10. Prairie Rattlesnake

Cottonmouths and Copperheads are somewhat common in Oklahoma and are typically found in habitats near water and wooded areas. The Rattlesnakes in Oklahoma may also be found in wooded areas but are also happy to be in more arid or dry areas and can be found along rocky outcrops. There are 10 species of venomous snakes in Oklahoma.

37. Oregon

Venomous snakes in Oregon: 

  1. Great Basin Rattlesnake
  2. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake

Venomous snakes in Oregon can be hard to find and are not commonly encountered. The Rattlesnakes in Oregon are most often found once the weather starts to warm up. When they are encountered, they are typically found along forest trails in the central to Western part of the state.

38. Pennsylvania

Venomous snakes in Pennsylvania: 

  1. Timber Rattlesnake
  2. Northern Copperhead
  3. Eastern Massasauga

There are 3 venomous species in the state, but the most common venomous snake to find in Pennsylvania is the Timber Rattlesnake. Timber Rattlesnakes are found in rocky areas and forests throughout most of the state. Northern Copperheads are slightly less common and is found in areas similar to the Timber Rattlesnake. Eastern Massasaugas are endangered in the state and much less common.

39. Rhode Island

Venomous snakes in Rhode Island:

Like several other U.S. states, there are no venomous snakes found in Rhode Island.

40. South Carolina

Venomous snakes in South Carolina:

  1. Carolina Pygmy Rattlesnake
  2. Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake
  3. Eastern Coral Snake
  4. Eastern Cottonmouth
  5. Eastern Diamond Rattlesnake
  6. Florida Cottonmouth
  7. Timber Rattlesnake
  8. Southern Copperhead
  9. Northern Copperhead

The Copperheads of South Carolina are arguably the most common Venomous Snakes in South Carolina. The Copperheads, Pygmy Rattlesnakes and Timber Rattlesnakes are found throughout nearly the entire state. Cottonmouths are found in the Eastern half of the state along with Eastern Diamondbacks and Coral Snakes however Coral Snakes are incredibly rare. South Carolina has 9 species of venomous snakes.

image: University of Georgia | Public domain | Cottonmouth

41. South Dakota

Venomous snakes in South Dakota: 

  1. Prairie Rattlesnake

Like its neighbor, North Dakota, South Dakota is home to a single species of venomous snake. The Prairie Rattlesnake occurs throughout the Western half of the state where they can be found in prairies, grasslands, meadows, and in forests.

42. Tennessee

Venomous snakes in Tennessee: 

  1. Southern Copperhead
  2. Northern Copperhead
  3. Western Cottonmouth
  4. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake
  5. Timber Rattlesnake

Including both subspecies of Copperheads, there are 5 species of venomous snakes in Tennessee. Copperheads and Cottonmouths are commonly found in Tennessee as they are more tolerant of human disturbed areas than some of the other species found in Tennessee. Timber Rattlesnakes are also relatively common but stick to more secluded wooded areas. Western Pygmy Rattlesnakes are listed as threatened in Tennessee.

43. Texas

Venomous snakes in Texas:

  1. Banded Rock Rattlesnake
  2. Broad-banded Copperhead
  3. Desert Massasauga
  4. Mojave Rattlesnake
  5. Mottled Rock Rattlesnake
  6. Northern Black-tailed Rattlesnake
  7. Prairie Rattlesnake
  8. Southern Copperhead
  9. Texas Coral Snake
  10. Timber Rattlesnake
  11. Trans-Pecos Copperhead
  12. Western Cottonmouth
  13. Western Diamondback Rattlesnake
  14. Western Massasauga
  15. Western Pygmy Rattlesnake

Texas is home to 15 different species/subspecies of venomous snakes, making it one of the more biodiverse states for venomous snakes. Venomous snakes are common in rural areas and secluded habitats, but can also be common near people houses hiding in brush piles, wood piles, garages, etc.

44. Utah

Venomous snakes in Utah:

  1. Great Basin Rattlesnake
  2. Yellow Rattlesnake
  3. Mojave Desert Sidewinder
  4. Mojave Rattlesnake
  5. Prairie Rattlesnake
  6. Southwestern Speckled Rattlesnake

The dry climate in Utah is great for the 6 Rattlesnake species that live there. These species can mostly be found in desert areas in Utah and occur scattered throughout the state. Less common of these snakes are the Mojave Rattlesnake and Mojave Desert Sidewinder, which are only found in the very Southwestern corner of the state.

image: gilaman | Flickr | CC BY 2.0 | Sidewinder

45. Vermont

Venomous snakes in Vermont:

  1. Timber Rattlesnake

Like other states in the Northeast, the only venomous species found in Vermont is the Timber Rattlesnake. Timber Rattlesnakes are rarely encountered in Vermont but are occasionally found in rocky areas and woodlands. Timber Rattlesnakes are endangered in Vermont and people are encouraged to report any sightings.

46. Virginia

Venomous snakes in Virginia: 

  • Eastern Cottonmouth
  • Timber Rattlesnake
  • Northern Copperhead

Copperheads are the most commonly seen venomous snakes in Virginia. Copperheads are found all throughout the state. Timber Rattlesnakes stick to the more mountainous regions of the state while Cottonmouths spend time in wetlands in Southern Virginia. There are 3 species of venomous snakes in Virginia.

47. Washington

Venomous snakes in Washington:

  1. Northern Pacific Rattlesnake

Washington is segmented into two regions by a mountain range separating Eastern and Western Washington. Once you cross over into Eastern Washington, the climate changes and is much drier. This dry climate is great for Northern Pacific Rattlesnakes, the only species of venomous snakes in Washington state, which tend to be found in rocky areas.

48. West Virginia

Venomous snakes in West Virginia: 

  1. Timber Rattlesnake
  2. Northern Copperhead

Of the two types of venomous snakes found in West Virginia, Northern Copperheads are more common. Northern Copperheads and Timber Rattlesnakes can be found in the Appalachian Mountains running through West Virginia and are sometimes encountered by hikers on the trail.

49. Wisconsin

Venomous snakes in Wisconsin:

  1. Timber Rattlesnake
  2. Eastern Massasauga

Both species of venomous snakes in Wisconsin, the Eastern Massasauga or the Timber Rattlesnake, are super common in the state. Eastern Massasaugas are actually endangered in the state and Timber Rattlesnakes are listed as “special concern”, suggesting that the populations for these species are declining. These two snakes are typically restricted to Southwestern Wisconsin

50. Wyoming

Venomous snakes in Wyoming: 

  1. Yellow Rattlesnake
  2. Prairie Rattlesnake

In Wyoming, Prairie Rattlesnakes are relatively common and can be found in roughly two thirds of the state. They are often found in rocky outcrops and in prairie habitats. The Yellow Rattlesnake is much less common and is only found around Flaming Gorge.

Want to learn more?
If you want to see pictures of any of the species on this list, check out this article showing all 22 species of venomous snakes in the U.S.