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27 Animals That End With the Letter K (Photos, Facts)

In this article, we’ll expand our knowledge by exploring some diverse animals that all end with the letter K. We’ve found 27 unique species fitting this category, from skinks to skunks to sharks and more. Let’s learn some interesting facts about these wild animals.

1. Woodchuck

Woodchuck Groundhog grazing
Woodchuck groundhog grazing | image by Paul VanDerWerf via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Marmota monax

The Woodchuck, also known as the groundhog, is a rodent native to North America. It is known for its stout body, short legs, and bushy tail. Woodchucks are excellent diggers, creating intricate burrow systems underground where they hibernate during winter and raise their young. They primarily inhabit open fields, meadows, and woodland edges across the eastern United States and Canada.

Woodchucks are herbivores, feeding on a variety of plants, grasses, and fruits. They are solitary animals, except during breeding season in early spring. A famous tradition associated with woodchucks is Groundhog Day, where people observe whether a woodchuck sees its shadow to predict the arrival of spring.

2. Alpine chipmunk

Alpine chipmunk
Alpine chipmunk | image by bgwashburn via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Tamias alpinus

The Alpine chipmunk is a small rodent found in high-altitude regions of western North America. It has distinctive stripes along its back and sides, aiding in camouflage. Alpine chipmunks are known for their agility and quick movements. They inhabit mountainous areas, including alpine meadows and rocky slopes.

These chipmunks are omnivorous, feeding on seeds, nuts, berries, and insects. They are active during the day and spend much of their time foraging for food and storing it in burrows or caches. During winter, Alpine chipmunks enter a state of torpor to conserve energy.

3. Bull shark

Bull shark
Bull shark | image by Albert Kok~enwiki via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 4.0

Scientific Name: Carcharhinus leucas

The Bull shark is a formidable shark species known for its stout body and aggressive nature. It has a distinctive appearance with a broad, blunt snout and powerful jaws. Bull sharks are highly adaptable and can thrive in both saltwater and freshwater environments, often found in rivers, estuaries, and coastal areas around the world, including warm tropical regions. They are opportunistic hunters, feeding on a variety of prey including fish, turtles, birds, and even other sharks.

Bull sharks are known for their ability to tolerate low salinity levels, allowing them to travel far inland through rivers. They are considered one of the most dangerous shark species to humans due to their tendency to inhabit shallow waters frequented by swimmers and their aggressive feeding behavior.

4. Eastern chipmunk

Eastern Chipmunk sitting on the ground
Eastern chipmunk sitting on the ground | image by Denis Fournier via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Tamias striatus

The Eastern chipmunk is a small, striped rodent native to eastern North America. It has distinctive stripes along its back and sides, which help it blend into its woodland habitat. Eastern chipmunks are known for their cheek pouches, which they use to carry food and nesting materials.

They are active during the day and spend much of their time foraging for nuts, seeds, fruits, and insects. Eastern chipmunks create elaborate burrow systems underground where they store food and hibernate during the winter months. They are commonly found in forests, woodlands, and suburban areas across their range.

5. California chipmunk

California chipmunk
California chipmunk | image by opisska via iNaturalist | CC BY 4.0

Scientific Name: Tamias obscurus

The California chipmunk is a small rodent species native to western North America, primarily found in the state of California. It features distinct stripes along its body, aiding in camouflage in its chaparral, woodland, and mountainous habitats. California chipmunks are known for their agility and quick movements, enabling them to evade predators effectively.

They are omnivores, consuming a variety of foods such as seeds, nuts, fruits, and insects. California chipmunks are active during the day, spending much of their time foraging and storing food in burrows or caches.

6. Colorado chipmunk

Colorado chipmunk
source: ALAN SCHMIERER via Flickr

Scientific Name: Tamias quadrivittatus

The Colorado chipmunk is a small rodent species endemic to Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico. It is characterized by its striped fur pattern, which helps it blend into its mountainous and forested habitats. Colorado chipmunks are agile and quick, allowing them to navigate through rocky terrain efficiently.

They are omnivores, feeding on seeds, nuts, berries, and insects. Colorado chipmunks are diurnal animals, meaning they are active during the day, foraging for food and storing it in burrows or caches.

7. Chinook

Chinook salmon on shallow water
Chinook salmon on shallow water | image by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Headquarters via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

The Chinook salmon is a species of fish native to the Pacific Northwest of North America. It is known for its large size, streamlined body, and distinctive silver coloration. Chinook salmon are anadromous, meaning they hatch in freshwater rivers, migrate to the ocean to mature, and return to their natal rivers to spawn. They are renowned for their strength and are prized by anglers for sport fishing.

Chinook salmon play a crucial role in the ecosystems they inhabit, providing food for other animals and helping to transport nutrients from the ocean to freshwater environments. They are distributed along the Pacific coast, ranging from California to Alaska, and can be found in a variety of habitats, including rivers, streams, and estuaries.

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8. Duck

Domesticated duck
Domesticated duck | image by Shawn McCready via Flickr | CC BY-ND 2.0

Scientific Name: Anatidae

Duck is a type of waterfowl characterized by its webbed feet, broad bill, and waterproof feathers. Ducks are known for their ability to swim and dive in water bodies like ponds, lakes, and rivers. They are omnivorous birds, feeding on a variety of aquatic plants, insects, and small fish.

Ducks often migrate during the winter to warmer regions, while some species remain in their habitats year-round. They exhibit social behaviors and can be found in flocks, especially during migration. Ducks are distributed globally and inhabit a wide range of habitats, including wetlands, marshes, and coastal areas.

9. American mink

American Mink at rest
American mink at rest | image by Peter Trimming via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Neovison vison

The American mink is a small carnivorous mammal native to North America, known for its sleek, dark fur and semi-aquatic lifestyle. Minks have long, slender bodies and sharp claws, which aid in hunting for prey such as fish, amphibians, birds, and small mammals. They are excellent swimmers and can dive underwater to catch food.

American minks are solitary animals, preferring to live near freshwater habitats like rivers, streams, and marshes. They are distributed across North America and have been introduced to other parts of the world for fur farming.

10. American hog-nosed skunk

American hog-nosed skunk
American hog-nosed skunk | image by Saguaro National Park via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Conepatus leuconotus

The American hog-nosed skunk is a species of skunk found in North America, known for its distinct hog-like snout and black and white fur pattern. These skunks have a unique defense mechanism where they will perform a series of bluff charges, foot stamping, and hissing before resorting to spraying a foul-smelling liquid. They are omnivores, feeding on a variety of foods including insects, small mammals, fruits, and plants.

American hog-nosed skunks are primarily found in the southwestern United States and parts of Mexico, inhabiting desert scrublands, grasslands, and agricultural areas. They are mostly nocturnal animals, spending their days in burrows or dens and emerging at night to forage for food. American hog-nosed skunks are among the various types of skunks that inhabit North America, playing a role in controlling insect populations and serving as important members of their ecosystems.

11. Striped skunk

Striped skunk
Striped skunk | image by Dan Dzurisin via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Mephitis mephitis

The Striped skunk is a mammal known for its distinctive black and white fur pattern, which serves as a warning to potential predators. It has a small head, and bushy tail, and can emit a strong-smelling spray as a defense mechanism. Striped skunks are omnivores, feeding on insects, small mammals, fruits, and plants.

They are primarily nocturnal, spending their nights foraging for food in a variety of habitats, including forests, grasslands, and urban areas. Striped skunks are widely distributed across North America, from Canada to Mexico.

They are adaptable animals and can thrive in diverse environments. Despite their reputation for their foul odor, striped skunks play a valuable role in controlling insect populations. Some unique facts about striped skunks include their ability to spray accurately up to 10 feet away, their excellent digging skills for burrowing, and their ability to live near human settlements.

12. Hooded skunk

Hooded skunk
image by ALAN SCHMIERER via Flickr

Scientific Name: Mephitis macroura

The Hooded skunk is a species of skunk known for the distinct pattern on its back resembling a hood. It has black fur with a white stripe down its back, extending to the head. Hooded skunks are smaller than other skunk species and have longer fur on their tails. They are primarily nocturnal, foraging for insects, small mammals, fruits, and plants in various habitats such as forests, grasslands, and scrublands.

Hooded skunks are found in parts of Mexico, Central America, and the southwestern United States. They are solitary animals and are known for their defensive behavior of raising their tails and stamping their feet before spraying a foul-smelling liquid when threatened.

13. Blackbuck

Blackbuck resting
Blackbuck resting | image by Heather Paul via Flickr | CC BY-ND 2.0

Scientific Name: Antilope cervicapra

The Blackbuck is a species of antelope native to the Indian subcontinent, known for its distinctive black and white fur markings and long, spiraled horns in males. They are medium-sized antelopes with slender bodies and graceful movements. Blackbucks inhabit grasslands, plains, and open woodlands where they feed on grasses and herbs. They are highly social animals, forming herds led by dominant males.

Blackbucks are distributed across India, Pakistan, and Nepal. They are known for their remarkable speed and agility, capable of reaching speeds of up to 50 miles per hour when fleeing from predators.

14. Gemsbok

Gemsbok
Gemsbok | image by Bernard DUPONT via Flickr | CC BY-SA 2.0

Scientific Name: Oryx gazella

The Gemsbok is a species of antelope native to Southern Africa, recognized for its appearance characterized by long, straight horns and distinctive black and white facial markings. Gemsbok have tan-colored coats with lighter underbellies, well-adapted for the arid and semi-arid environments they inhabit, including deserts, savannas, and scrublands. They are herbivores, primarily feeding on grasses, leaves, and occasional shrubs.

Gemsbok are highly adaptable and can survive in harsh conditions with limited water sources. They form small herds led by dominant males and exhibit strong territorial behavior, defending their territories vigorously. Gemsbok is distributed across countries such as Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, and parts of Angola and Zimbabwe.

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15. Brown basilisk

Brown basilisk on bamboo sticks
Brown basilisk on bamboo sticks | image by Pavel Kirillov via Flickr | CC BY-SA 2.0

Scientific Name: Basiliscus vittatus

The Brown basilisk is a species of lizard native to Central and South America, and they have been introduced to the state of Florida. It is characterized by its brown coloration and long, slender body. The most notable feature of the brown basilisk is its ability to run across water, earning it the nickname “Jesus Christ lizard.”

This lizard is diurnal and spends much of its time basking in the sun near water sources such as streams and rivers. Brown basilisks are omnivorous, feeding on insects, small vertebrates, fruits, and vegetation.

They are agile climbers and excellent swimmers, using their powerful hind legs and long tails for propulsion in water. Brown basilisks are found in tropical forests and lowland habitats throughout their range, including countries like Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, and Ecuador.

16. Coal skink

Coal skink
Coal skink | image by Leafyplant via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 3.0

Scientific Name: Plestiodon anthracinus

The Coal skink is a species of lizard native to the southeastern United States. It is small in size, typically growing up to about 4 inches long, and has a sleek, shiny appearance, hence the name “coal skink.” These lizards have smooth, black, or dark brown scales with lighter markings.

Coal skinks are secretive and often found hiding under rocks, logs, or leaf litter in moist forested areas, including woodlands and stream banks. They are insectivores, feeding primarily on small insects and spiders.

Coal skinks are known for their swift movements and ability to quickly retreat into hiding when threatened. They are distributed throughout the southeastern states, including parts of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi.

17. Mole skink

Bluetail mole skink
Bluetail mole skink | image by Glenn Bartolotti via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 4.0

Scientific Name: Plestiodon egregius

The Bluetail mole skink is a small lizard species native to the southeastern United States, primarily found in Florida. It is characterized by its slender body and distinctive blue tail, which distinguishes it from other mole skink species. Bluetail mole skinks have smooth, shiny scales and typically range in color from brown to gray, blending in with their sandy or loamy habitats.

They are adapted for burrowing and are often found in sandy areas near water bodies such as marshes, swamps, and wetlands. Bluetail mole skinks are insectivores, feeding primarily on small insects and spiders found in the leaf litter and soil. They are secretive creatures, spending much of their time underground in burrows or hiding beneath surface debris.

18. Five-lined skink

Common five-lined skink 
Common five-lined skink | image by Judy Gallagher via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Plestiodon fasciatus

The Five-lined skink is a small lizard species native to eastern North America. It is characterized by its sleek body and distinct pattern of five dark stripes running down its back. Younger individuals often have a bright blue tail that fades with age.

Five-lined skinks are commonly found in forests, woodlands, and grassy areas with ample vegetation for cover. They are insectivores, feeding on a variety of small insects and spiders.

These skinks are agile climbers and are often seen basking on rocks, logs, or tree trunks. Five-lined skinks are distributed throughout eastern North America, ranging from southern Canada to Florida and west to Texas. They are known for their ability to shed their tails as a defense mechanism when threatened by predators, which allows them to escape and regenerate a new tail over time.

19. Southeastern five-lined skink

Southeastern five-lined skink
Southeastern five-lined skink | image by gailhampshire via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Plestiodon inexpectatus

The Southeastern five-lined skink is a lizard species native to the southeastern United States. It shares similarities with the broader five-lined skink, including a sleek body and distinct pattern of five dark stripes down its back. Juvenile southeastern five-lined skinks often display a bright blue tail that fades with age.

They inhabit forests, woodlands, and grassy areas with ample vegetation for cover. Southeastern five-lined skinks feed on small insects and spiders and are agile climbers. They are commonly found in states like Florida, Georgia, and Alabama.

20. Florida sand skink

Florida sand skink on sandy surface
Florida sand skink on sandy surface | image by Alessandro Catenazzi via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 2.5

Scientific Name: Neoseps reynoldsi

The Florida sand skink is a small, legless lizard unique to the sandy ridges of central Florida. This elusive creature is distinguished by its smooth, shiny, golden-brown skin and a streamlined body that allows it to “swim” through sand. Unlike most lizards, the Florida sand skink has tiny, vestigial legs, which are more apparent in their movements as slight undulations rather than functional limbs.

It primarily feeds on insects and spiders, utilizing its burrowing lifestyle to avoid predators and the heat of the day. The skink’s habitat is limited to well-drained, sandy soils within scrub and pine flatwoods, ecosystems that are increasingly threatened by development and habitat loss.

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21. Great Plains skink

Great plains skink
Great Plains skink | image by Todd Morris via Flickr | CC BY-SA 2.0

Scientific Name: Plestiodon obsoletus

The Great Plains skink is a large lizard found across the central United States, notably within the Great Plains region. This skink is recognized by its robust build, long tail, and distinctive keeled scales, which give it a somewhat prehistoric appearance. It boasts a variable coloration, often a mix of browns and grays, helping it blend into its surroundings.

The Great Plains skink is adaptable, inhabiting a range of environments from grasslands to rocky areas and woodlands, where it hunts for insects, spiders, and small vertebrates. Notably active during the day, it can also be seen basking in the sun on rocks or logs. This species exhibits interesting behaviors such as tail autotomy to escape predators and a complex mating ritual that includes vocalizations rare among lizards.

22. Prairie skink

Prairie skink crawling
Prairie skink crawling | image by Forest Service Northern Region via Flickr

Scientific Name: Plestiodon septentrionalis

The prairie skink is a small lizard species native to the central United States. It has a slender body with smooth, glossy scales and distinctive stripes or patterns along its sides. Prairie skinks are known for their ability to quickly burrow into loose soil and seek shelter underground.

They primarily inhabit grasslands, prairies, and open woodlands where they feed on insects and small invertebrates. Prairie skinks are secretive and elusive, often avoiding human interaction. They are distributed across the central United States, including states like Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma.

23. Peacock

peacock on land
Peacock on land

Scientific Name:Pavo cristatus

The Peacock is a large and colorful bird known for its extravagant plumage, especially in the male. Male peacocks display iridescent blue-green feathers and vibrant tails adorned with colorful “eyes” or “ocelli.” Peafowl, including both peacocks and peahens, are native to South Asia but have been introduced to various parts of the world. They are often found in forests and woodlands, foraging for insects, seeds, and plants.

During mating season, male peacocks perform elaborate courtship displays to attract females. While they can fly short distances to roost in trees or escape predators, their large and heavy tail feathers make sustained flight difficult.

24. Yak

Wild yak
Wild yak | image by 4028mdk09 via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 3.0

Scientific Name: Bos grunniens

The Yak is a large bovine species native to the Himalayan region of Central Asia. It is characterized by its shaggy coat, long horns, and robust build, which help it survive in harsh mountain environments. Yaks are well adapted to high altitudes, where they graze on tough grasses and other vegetation. They are used by local communities for transportation, milk, meat, and fiber.

Yaks have a calm and docile temperament but can be aggressive when threatened. They form herds led by dominant males and have a hierarchical social structure. Yaks are distributed across Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, and other parts of Central Asia, primarily inhabiting alpine meadows and steep mountain slopes.

25. Whale shark

Whale shark underwater
Whale shark underwater

Scientific Name: Rhincodon typus

The Whale shark is the largest fish species in the world, known for its massive size and distinctive markings. It has a wide mouth and filter-feeding apparatus, allowing it to consume plankton and small fish. Whale sharks have unique white spots and stripes on their blue-gray bodies. They are gentle creatures, often found swimming near the ocean’s surface in warm tropical waters.

Whale sharks are migratory and can be found in oceans worldwide, particularly in areas with rich plankton populations, such as the Coral Triangle, the Gulf of Mexico, and the coast of Australia. Despite their enormous size, whale sharks are docile and pose no threat to humans.

26. Tiger shark

Tiger shark underwater
Tiger shark underwater | image by Kris-Mikael Krister via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Galeocerdo cuvier

The Tiger shark is a large predatory fish known for its distinctive stripes and aggressive feeding habits. It has a robust body and powerful jaws lined with sharp teeth, allowing it to consume a wide variety of prey, including fish, seals, and even sea turtles. Tiger sharks are named for their dark stripes along their bodies, which fade as they mature.

They are found in tropical and subtropical waters around the world, often inhabiting coastal areas, coral reefs, and deep oceanic waters. Tiger sharks are opportunistic hunters and scavengers, known for their ability to eat almost anything they encounter. They play a crucial role in marine ecosystems as apex predators, helping to regulate prey populations and maintain ecosystem balance.

27. Zebra shark

Zebra shark
Zebra shark | image by Gp258 via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 4.0

Scientific Name: Stegostoma tigrinum

The Zebra shark is a species of carpet shark known for its distinctive pattern of dark spots and stripes resembling a zebra’s markings, which fade as they mature. They have elongated bodies and long, slender tails, with barbels near their nostrils. Zebra sharks are primarily found in the Indo-Pacific region, inhabiting coral reefs, sandy flats, and shallow coastal waters.

They are nocturnal hunters, feeding on small fish, crustaceans, and mollusks. Zebra sharks are docile and gentle creatures, often observed resting on the seabed during the day. They are popular attractions in aquariums due to their unique appearance and calm demeanor.