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5 Water Snakes in Georgia (And 3 Semi-Aquatic)

Water snakes are a common and diverse group of reptiles found in the state of Georgia. They are semi-aquatic and can be found in various freshwater habitats, such as streams, rivers, lakes, and swamps. Water snakes play an important role in maintaining the balance of aquatic ecosystems, as they feed on a variety of prey, including fish, amphibians, and other reptiles.

There are several species of water snakes in Georgia, including the Midland water snake, Northern water snake, green water snake, and more. This article will detail eight water snakes found in the state of Georgia.

Collage of water snakes in Georgia

8 Water Snakes in Georgia

1. Midland Water Snake

Midland water snake
Midland water snake | image by Peter Paplanus via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Nerodia sipedon pleuralis

Midland Water Snakes are a subspecies of Northern Water Snakes that are commonly found in the state of Georgia. They are characterized by their brown or grayish coloration, with distinct dark bands or blotches running down the length of their body.

Midland Water Snakes can grow to be quite large, with some individuals reaching over 4 feet in length. They are semi-aquatic and can be found near freshwater habitats like rivers, streams, and ponds.

They are non-venomous and feed on a variety of prey, including fish, amphibians, and other reptiles. Midland Water Snakes are generally not aggressive toward humans and will only bite if they feel threatened.

2. Banded Water Snake

Banded water snake resting
A banded water snake resting

Scientific Name: Nerodia fasciata

Banded Water Snakes are a species of non-venomous water snake commonly found in the state of Georgia. They are named after the distinct yellow or tan bands that run along the length of their dark brown or gray bodies.

Banded water snakes can grow to be quite large, reaching lengths of up to 4 feet. They are semi-aquatic and can be found near freshwater habitats, such as rivers, streams, and swamps in Georgia. Banded water snakes feed on a variety of prey, including fish, amphibians, and other reptiles.

3. Northern Water Snake

Northern water snake basking
Northern water snake basking | image by via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Nerodia sipedon

Northern Water Snakes are a species of non-venomous water snake commonly found in the state of Georgia. They are characterized by their brown or gray coloration, with distinct dark crossbands or blotches running down the length of their body.

These large snakes can grow to be over 4 feet in length. They can be found near freshwater habitats, such as rivers, streams, and ponds.

Northern Water Snakes are opportunistic feeders and feed on a variety of prey, including fish, amphibians, and other reptiles. They play an important role in controlling the populations of their prey and maintaining the balance of aquatic ecosystems in Georgia.

4. Red-bellied Water Snake

Red-bellied water snake slithering
A red-bellied water snake slithering | image by Ryan Somma via Flickr | CC BY-SA 2.0

Scientific Name: Nerodia erythrogaster

Red-bellied Water Snakes are a non-venomous species of water snake commonly found in the state of Georgia. They are named after the distinct reddish coloration on the underside of their belly.

Red-bellied water snakes have a brown or gray coloration on the upper body, with dark crossbands or blotches running down the length of their body. Their scales appear to be raised rather than smooth, giving them a rough appearance.

On average, this species measures between 2 and 4 feet in length. Red-bellied water snakes can be found near freshwater habitats, such as rivers, streams, and ponds in Georgia. Their diet primarily consists of fish, amphibians, and other reptiles.

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5. Brown Water Snake

Brown water snake on log
A brown water snake on log | image by Kelly Verdeck via Flickr | CC BY-ND 2.0

Scientific Name: Nerodia taxispilota

Brown Water Snakes are named after their dark brown or black coloration, which serves as excellent camouflage in their aquatic habitats. This non-venomous species can grow to be quite large, measuring between 2.5 and 5 feet in length. They are semi-aquatic and can be found near freshwater habitats, such as rivers, streams, and swamps in Georgia.

Brown water snakes feed on a variety of prey, including fish, amphibians, and other reptiles. Their favorite thing to eat is catfish. This species likes to lounge on tree branches along the water’s edge to bask in the sun.

Semi-aquatic snakes in Georgia

Striped Crayfish Snake

Striped-crayfish snake
A striped-crayfish snake | image by Ashley Wahlberg (Tubbs) via Flickr | CC BY-ND 2.0

Scientific Name: Liodytes alleni

Striped Crayfish Snakes are a species of non-venomous semi-aquatic snake found in the state of Georgia. While they are more common in Florida, this species has recently been found in extreme southern regions of Georgia. They are named after their preferred prey, crayfish, and the distinctive yellow or tan stripes that run along the length of their dark brown or gray bodies.

Striped Crayfish Snakes are relatively small, reaching a maximum length of about 2 feet, and they have heavier bodies with short heads and big eyes. They can be found near freshwater habitats, such as rivers, streams, and swamps.

Cottonmouth

Coiled cottonmouth snake
Coiled cottonmouth snake | image by smashtonlee05 via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Agkistrodon piscivorus

Cottonmouths, also known as water moccasins, are a species of venomous snake commonly found in the state of Georgia. They are named after the white inside of their mouth, which they display as a warning sign when threatened.

Cottonmouths are typically large, with some individuals reaching over 4 feet in length, and have a dark coloration with distinctive crossbands or blotches running down their bodies. They are semi-aquatic and can be found near freshwater habitats, such as rivers, streams, and swamps.

They feed on a variety of prey, including fish, amphibians, and other reptiles, but are also known to be opportunistic feeders and will consume small mammals and birds.

Queen Snake

Queensnake
Queen snake | image by Peter Paplanus via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Regina septemvittata

The Queen Snake is a species of non-venomous snake found in the eastern and central United States, including the state of Georgia. They are typically light-colored with dark brown or black stripes running down the length of their bodies.

Queen snakes are semi-aquatic and can be found near streams, rivers, and ponds. They feed on a variety of prey, including crayfish, which make up a large portion of their diet.

Queen snakes are not aggressive toward humans and will typically try to escape if confronted. These snakes play an important role in the ecosystem as predators of crayfish and other aquatic species, helping to maintain the balance of the food chain. If you encounter a Queen snake in the wild, it is best to observe it from a safe distance and give it plenty of space to continue on its way.

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