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13 Examples of Animals Like Hedgehogs

Hedgehogs are one of the most unique animals on Earth. They are small, spiny mammals that live in Europe, Asia, and Africa. There are around 17 species of hedgehog, and they vary in size from 4 to 12 inches long.

Hedgehogs are nocturnal, meaning they are active at night. They have very good hearing and smell and can run up to 4 mph.

Hedgehogs are known for their spines, which are actually modified hairs. These spines are stiff and sharp and help protect them from predators. When they feel threatened, it will roll up into a tight ball so that its spines are pointing outwards.

This makes it very difficult for predators to attack. Hedgehogs are omnivores, meaning they eat both plants and animals.

Their diet includes insects, grubs, frogs, snakes, rodents, eggs, and berries. Here are other animals like hedgehogs.

13 Animals Like Hedgehogs

The scientific name for a hedgehog is Erinaceus. Hedgehogs are related to shrews and moles. Male hedgehogs are called boars, and female hedgehogs are called sows.

Baby hedgehogs are called hoglets. Hedgehogs have poor eyesight and can live for up to six years in the wild and ten years in captivity. Now that you know some fun facts about hedgehogs, here are other animals like them.

1. Moonrat

moonrat isolated on light green background
Moonrat isolated on light green background | image by Haplochromis via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 3.0

Scientific Name: Echinosorex gymnura

The moonrat is a small, nocturnal mammal that can be found in the forests of Southeast Asia. Although it is most active at night, it will also forage for food during the day if necessary. Its diet consists primarily of insects but will also consume terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates.

In many ways, the moonrat resembles a hedgehog, but it does not have toxic spines on its back. Nevertheless, the two animals share a number of similarities, such as their nocturnal habits and their diet of insects.

2. Large-Eared Tenrec

Scientific Name: Geogale aurita

The Large-Eared Tenrec is a small, nocturnal mammal native to Madagascar. It is most closely related to hedgehogs and shares many of the same features, including its fondness for insects.

However, the Large-Eared Tenrec is much better suited to life in the rainforest than its prickly cousin. Its diet consists mainly of termites, which it hunts using its keen sense of smell. Sadly, this remarkable creature is under threat from habitat loss and deforestation.

3. Highland Streaked Tenrec

highland streaked tenrec
A threatened Highland Streaked Tenrec | image by Esther Böck via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 4.0

Scientific Name: Hemicentetes nigriceps

The Highland Streaked Tenrec is a small mammal that can be found in the rainforests of Madagascar. It is closely related to the Large-Eared Tenrec and shares many of the same features, including its love of insects. It’s also covered in quills, which protect it from predators.

These quills detach easily and can work their way into the skin of any would-be attacker, causing irritation. The Highland Streaked Tenrec uses its snout to dig for food in the leaf litter of the forest floor.

4. Solenodon

solenodon
Hispaniola solenodon showing his slender body | image by belgianchocolate via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Solenodontidae

The Solenodon is a small, nocturnal mammal that can be found in Cuba and the Dominican Republic. It is closely related to hedgehogs and shares many of the same features, including its poor eyesight and love of insects.

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However, the Solenodon has a long, snake-like snout that it uses to sniff out its prey. It also has toxic saliva that it uses to kill its prey. These unusual features make the Solenodon one of the most fascinating animals in the world.

5. Web-Footed Tenrec

Scientific Name: Limnogale mergulus

The Web-footed Tenrec is a small mammal that is found in Madagascar. It is a member of the Tenrec family, which includes other small animals such as hedgehogs and shrews.

The Web-footed Tenrec is unique among its family members in that it has webbed feet, which help it move more easily through its wet environments. The Web-footed Tenrec feeds primarily on insects but will also eat crustaceans and small fish. It is a nocturnal creature, so it does most of its hunting at night.

6. Echidna

echidna showing its sharp quills
Echidna showing its sharp quills | image by S J Bennett via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Tachyglossus aculeatus

The echidna is a small, spiny mammal. Like the hedgehog, it has a body covered in long, sharp quills. However, there are several differences between the two animals.

For one, the echidna is a much larger animal than the hedgehog. Additionally, the echidna has a beak, while the hedgehog does not. It is also one of the few mammals that lay eggs.

The echidna feeds on ants and termites, using its long, sticky tongue to catch its prey. It is found in various habitats, including forests, deserts, and grasslands. While the majority of echidnas are found in Australia, a small population can also be found in New Guinea.

7. Golden Moles

cape golden mole
Resting Cape Golden Mole | image by magrietb via iNaturalist | CC BY-SA 4.0

Scientific Name: Chrysochloridae

The golden mole is a small, burrowing mammal found in southern Africa. It is the only member of its family, the Chrysochloridae. Golden moles are generally solitary animals, and they are seldom seen above ground.

They spend most of their time in burrows, where they feed on insects and other small invertebrates. Golden moles are somewhat similar in appearance to hedgehogs, with short, spiny fur and a small, pointed snout.

However, they lack the hedgehog’s distinctive quills. Golden moles are also blind, and their tiny eyes are covered by skin.

Despite their poor vision, golden moles are skilled diggers, using their powerful claws to excavate burrows. These subterranean homes provide protection from predators and the harsh African sun.

8. Rothschild’s Porcupine

rothschild’s porcupine
Rothschild’s porcupine standing on a log | image by Beatrice Murch via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Coendou rothschildi

Rothschild’s Porcupine is a small, spiny mammal found in the rainforests of Central and South America. It is a member of the New World porcupine family, which includes other animals such as the Andean porcupine, Coandumirim, among others.

Rothschild’s Porcupine is similar in appearance to other porcupines, with dark fur and long, sharp quills. The Rothschild’s Porcupine is a nocturnal creature, spending most of its time in trees.

It feeds on a variety of fruits, vegetables, and nuts. One fun fact is that it’s named after British zoologist Lionel Walter Rothschild.

9. North American Porcupine

North American porcupine
Northern American Porcupine | Image by Bernell MacDonald from Pixabay

Scientific Name: Erethizon dorsatum

The North American porcupine is a large, spiny mammal found in the forests of North America. It is a member of the New World porcupine family and is one of the largest porcupines in their family, with an average length of 24 inches, and they can weigh up to 27 lb.

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The North American porcupine is a herbivore and feeds mainly on leaves, twigs, and berries but can also eat nuts and insects. North American porcupines are good swimmers and can climb trees. They have poor eyesight but make up for it with their keen sense of smell.

10. Mindanao Gymnure

Scientific Name: Podogymnura truei

The Mindanao Gymnure is a nocturnal mammal found only in the Mindanao region of the Philippines. It is also known as the Mindanao moonrat and is closely related to the hedgehog. The Mindanao Gymnure has a small head and body covered in short, stiff fur. The back and sides of the body are gray or brown, while the belly is lighter in color.

This nocturnal creature feeds primarily on insects and earthworms. It typically lives in forests and grasslands near bodies of water. The Mindanao Gymnure does not have spines on its back. However, it does have long claws that it uses for digging and grooming. Although rarely seen by humans, the Mindanao Gymnure is an integral part of the ecosystem in which it lives.

11. Indian Crested Porcupine

indian crested porcupine
Indian Crested Porcupine | image by NasserHalaweh via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY-SA 4.0

Scientific Name: Hystrix indica

The Indian crested porcupine is a large, spiny mammal found in the forests of southern Asia. It is a member of the Old World porcupine family. These animals are nocturnal and generally solitary, spending their days in dens that they have dug out beneath the roots of trees or in abandoned burrows.

At night, they emerge to forage for food, which consists mainly of fruits, vegetables, and nuts. The Indian crested porcupine is often compared to the hedgehog; however, they cannot roll themselves into a tight ball. Instead, they will curl up with their quills facing outwards to deter predators.

12. Brazilian Porcupine

brazilian porcupine
Brazilian Porcupine standing on a log | image by thibaudaronson via iNaturalist | CC BY-SA 4.0

Scientific Name: Coendou prehensilis

The Brazilian porcupine is a member of the rodent family that is closely related to the African porcupine. These animals are found in the tropical forests of South America, where they spend most of their time in trees.

Brazilian porcupines are nocturnal creatures that subsist mostly on fruits, nuts, and seeds. These animals have sharp quills that cover their bodies and provide protection from predators. When threatened, Brazilian porcupines will erect their quills and make loud noises in an attempt to scare off their assailants.

13. Lowland Streaked Tenrec

lowland streaked tenrec
Lowland Streaked Tenrec sniffs on the ground | image by Frank Vassen via Wikimedia Commons | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Hemicentetes semispinosus

This is a small mammal found in the forests and grasslands of Madagascar. It is a member of the family Tenrecidae, which includes other animals such as the common tenrec and the Greater hedgehog tenrec.

The lowland streaked tenrec is nocturnal and feeds mainly on earthworms. It has yellow or chestnut-brown stripes running along its back and sides. Its quills are mainly found on its head and nuchal area.

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