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Future Periodical Cicada Broods Emergences (Next Decade)

Cicada broods are groups of cicadas that emerge in synchrony after spending years underground. These broods were first discovered and named by entomologists who observed their distinct, periodic emergences.

Each brood is assigned a Roman numeral and a cycle duration, either 13 or 17 years, depending on the species. The remarkable life cycles and mass emergences of these insects have fascinated scientists and the public alike, providing valuable insights into their behavior and ecological impact.

Current and Upcoming Periodical Cicada Emergences

2024: Brood XIII and Brood XIX

In 2024, witnessed the emergence of two significant cicada broods. Brood XIII, a 17-year cicada brood, will emerge in the northern Midwest, including parts of Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin. This brood’s arrival is expected to impact local ecosystems and agricultural activities, as the cicadas’ feeding habits can affect tree health.

Simultaneously, Brood XIX, a 13-year cicada brood, will appear in the southern Midwest and parts of the South, including Arkansas, Missouri, and Mississippi. The emergence of Brood XIX will offer researchers another opportunity to study the differences and similarities between 13-year and 17-year cicadas.

2025: Brood XIV

Brood XIV, a 17-year cicada brood, will emerge in 2025. This brood covers a broad range in the eastern United States, including parts of Kentucky, Tennessee, Ohio, and Indiana. The emergence of Brood XIV will bring large numbers of cicadas to these areas, creating a unique spectacle for residents and researchers alike. The synchronized emergence of millions of cicadas provides an opportunity to study their behavior, mating patterns, and the ecological impacts of their presence.

The dense populations of Brood XIV can have significant effects on local vegetation, particularly young trees and shrubs. The cicadas’ feeding habits and the females’ egg-laying practices, which involve cutting into tree branches, can cause damage known as “flagging.” However, this damage is generally temporary, and most trees recover. The emergence of Brood XIV will also offer a fascinating experience for those interested in nature, as the loud chorus of cicada songs fills the air during their brief but intense appearance.

2026: No Major Broods

In 2026 there are no major periodical cicada broods scheduled to emerge. This off-year provides a respite from the large-scale emergences that can sometimes disrupt local ecosystems and communities. While annual cicadas may still be present, their numbers are much smaller compared to the periodic broods, and they do not have the same dramatic impact.

This year offers a chance for researchers to analyze data from previous emergences and prepare for future ones. It is also a time for nature enthusiasts to reflect on the fascinating cycles of these insects and to appreciate the quieter, more predictable rhythms of the natural world without the overwhelming presence of millions of cicadas.

2027: Brood XXII

Brood XXII, a 13-year cicada brood, will emerge in 2027. This brood is expected to appear in parts of the southeastern United States. Areas such as Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama will witness the emergence of these periodical cicadas. The event will be characterized by the simultaneous appearance of vast numbers of cicadas, which will engage in their noisy mating rituals and create a unique natural phenomenon.

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The emergence of Brood XXII will provide valuable data for entomologists studying the life cycles and behaviors of periodical cicadas. Observing their interactions with the environment and their impact on local flora will help scientists understand the broader ecological implications of these periodic events. Additionally, the public will have the opportunity to experience one of nature’s most remarkable displays, as the cicadas’ songs fill the air and their presence becomes a temporary, yet unforgettable part of the landscape.

2028: Brood XXIII

In 2028, Brood XXIII, another 13-year cicada brood, will emerge. This brood will be observed in parts of the southern United States, including Louisiana, Mississippi, and Arkansas. The emergence of Brood XXIII will add to the series of periodic cicada events, each providing unique opportunities for scientific study and public engagement.

The emergence of Brood XXIII will bring a vibrant, albeit brief, period of activity as cicadas emerge, mate, and lay eggs before their life cycles conclude. This event will allow researchers to compare data from previous emergences and further understand the complex life cycles of these insects. For the public, it will be a chance to witness the incredible synchronization and sheer numbers of cicadas, a natural spectacle that is both fascinating and awe-inspiring.

2029: Brood I

Brood I, a 17-year cicada brood, will emerge in 2029. This brood is known as the Shenandoah Brood and is primarily found in parts of West Virginia, Virginia, and Tennessee. The emergence of Brood I will bring large numbers of cicadas to these regions, creating a unique natural event that draws attention from both scientists and the general public.

The synchronized emergence of Brood I will provide researchers with valuable data on cicada behavior, population dynamics, and ecological impacts. The presence of millions of cicadas can affect local vegetation and wildlife, offering a rare opportunity to study these interactions. For residents and visitors, the emergence of Brood I will be a memorable experience, marked by the loud chorus of cicada songs and the sight of these fascinating insects covering the landscape.

2030: Brood II

In 2030, Brood II, another 17-year cicada brood, will emerge. This brood will be observed along the East Coast, from Connecticut down to North Carolina. The emergence of Brood II will offer another spectacular display of nature’s periodic rhythms, with millions of cicadas emerging simultaneously.

The event will provide important data for scientists studying the life cycles and ecological roles of cicadas. Observing the interactions between cicadas and their environment will help researchers understand the broader impacts of these emergences on local ecosystems. For the public, the emergence of Brood II will be a fascinating natural event, offering an opportunity to witness one of nature’s most remarkable displays of synchronization and abundance.

2031: Brood III

Brood III, a 17-year cicada brood, will emerge in 2031. This brood is expected to appear in the northern Midwest, including parts of Iowa and Illinois. The emergence of Brood III will bring a significant number of cicadas to these areas, providing a unique opportunity for scientific study and public observation.

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The synchronized emergence of Brood III will allow researchers to gather valuable data on cicada behavior, population dynamics, and their impact on local ecosystems. The presence of millions of cicadas can have temporary effects on vegetation, but it also offers a fascinating insight into the complex life cycles of these insects. For the public, the emergence of Brood III will be an unforgettable experience, marked by the loud and persistent songs of cicadas filling the air.

cicada with husk
cicada

2032: Brood IV

In 2032, Brood IV, a 17-year cicada brood, will emerge in the central United States. This brood will be observed in areas such as Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska. The emergence of Brood IV will bring a significant number of cicadas to these regions, creating a unique natural event that draws attention from both scientists and the general public.

The synchronized emergence of Brood IV will provide researchers with valuable data on cicada behavior, population dynamics, and ecological impacts. Studying the interactions between cicadas and their environment will help scientists understand the broader implications of these periodic events. For the public, the emergence of Brood IV will be a memorable experience, marked by the loud chorus of cicada songs and the sight of these fascinating insects covering the landscape.

2033: Brood V

Brood V, a 17-year cicada brood, will emerge in 2033. This brood is expected to appear in parts of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. The emergence of Brood V will bring large numbers of cicadas to these areas, creating a unique natural spectacle that attracts both researchers and the general public.

The synchronized emergence of Brood V will provide scientists with valuable data on cicada behavior, population dynamics, and their impact on local ecosystems. Observing the interactions between cicadas and their environment will help researchers understand the broader ecological roles of these insects. For residents and visitors, the emergence of Brood V will be a fascinating and unforgettable experience, marked by the loud and persistent songs of cicadas filling the air.

2034: No Major Broods

In 2034, there are once again more no major cicada broods scheduled to emerge. This off-year provides a respite from the large-scale emergences that can sometimes disrupt local ecosystems and communities. While annual cicadas may still be present, their numbers are much smaller compared to the periodic broods, and they do not have the same dramatic impact.

This year offers a chance for researchers to analyze data from previous emergences and prepare for future ones. It is also a time for nature enthusiasts to reflect on the fascinating cycles of these insects and to appreciate the quieter, more predictable rhythms of the natural world without the overwhelming presence of millions of cicadas.

cicada life cycle 3 stages