Wildlife Informer is reader-supported. When you click and buy we may earn an affiliate commission at no cost to you. Learn more.

11 Common Spiders in Minnesota (ID Pictures)

In Minnesota, there are many types of common spiders. While some of these arachnids are harmless, others can seriously threaten humans. In this blog post, we will take a look at some of the most common spiders in Minnesota and their behaviors.

We will also discuss what to do if you come into contact with one of these arachnids. By the end of this blog post, you will know how to identify and safely remove spiders from your home.

11 Common Spiders in Minnesota

Minnesota is home to a variety of common spiders. Thanks to the state’s diverse landscape, from the tall-grass prairies of the northwest to the deciduous forests in the southeast, there are several different types of spiders that make their homes in Minnesota. Some of the most common include:

1. Black Widow Spider

Black widow on web
Black widow on web | Image by jgiammatteo from Pixabay

Scientific Name: Latrodectus mactans

The black widow spider is one of the most feared spiders in the world. These predators are known for their potent venom, which can cause serious health problems in humans.

Although black widows are found in many parts of the world, they are relatively rare in Minnesota. These spiders prefer warm climates and are most commonly found in the southern United States.

Black widows generally keep to themselves and are not aggressive towards humans. However, if they feel threatened, they will bite in self-defense.

The bites of black widow spiders can be painful, but they are not usually fatal. However, some people may experience more severe reactions, such as difficulty breathing or paralysis. If you suspect you have been bitten by a black widow spider, it is essential to seek medical attention immediately.

2. Fishing Spiders

Fishing spider
Fishing spider | image by Judy Gallagher via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Dolomedes

Fishing spiders are found throughout the United States, including Minnesota. They get their name from their hunting technique, which involves waiting near water for prey to come close enough to catch.

These spiders are large and can be quite intimidating, with some species reaching up to 3 inches in length. They are brown or black in color and have a distinctive pattern of markings on their abdomens.

Although they can bite humans, their venom is not considered dangerous. And while they are not actively aggressive, these spiders will only bite if they feel threatened.

3. Giant Lichen Orbweaver

Giant lichen orb weaver
Giant lichen orb weaver | image by Judy Gallagher via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Araneus bicentenarius

The giant lichen orb weaver is a type of spider found in wooded areas across the United States. These spiders build large, round webs that can reach up to two feet in diameter. Their webs are often decorated with bits of leaves and other debris.

Giant lichen orb weavers are not aggressive, and their bites are not considered dangerous to humans. However, if you come into contact with one of these spiders, it is vital to remove them from your home immediately. These spiders can cause serious damage to your property if they are left unchecked.

You may also like:  Are There Water Snakes in Minnesota? 

4. Wolf Spiders

A wolf spider at night
A wolf spider at night | Image by lolaclinton from Pixabay

Scientific Name: Lycosidae

Wolf spiders are large and hairy, commonly found in wooded areas and fields. They are hunting spiders, meaning they actively search for their prey rather than build webs to catch it. Their diet consists mostly of insects, but they also eat smaller spiders and other arthropods.

Wolf spiders are generally shy around humans and will only bite if they feel threatened. However, their bites can be painful and may cause swelling and redness.

These spiders are usually brown or grey in color, with markings that help them blend in with their surroundings. They range in size from less than an inch to over three inches in length.

Wolf spiders are not considered to be dangerous to humans, but they can be a nuisance if they enter homes in search of food. If you see a wolf spider in your home, it is best to capture and release it outdoors.

5. Banded Garden Spider

Banded garden spider
Banded garden spider | by USFWS Mountain-Prairie via Flickr

Scientific Name: Argiope trifasciata

The banded garden spider is common in gardens and fields across the United States. This spider is a member of the orb-weaver family, which means it builds a classic wheel-shaped web for catching prey.

These spiders are black with a distinctive white or yellow stripe running down their backs. They are relatively small, typically only reaching about half an inch in length.

Banded garden spiders primarily eat insects, although they will also occasionally consume smaller spiders. These arachnids are not considered dangerous to humans, as their venom is not strong enough to cause serious harm. However, they can bite if they feel threatened, so it is best to leave them alone if you come across one.

6. Starbellied Orb Weaver

Starbellied orb weaver
Starbellied orb weaver | image by Judy Gallagher via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Acanthepeira stellata

The star-bellied orb weaver is a type of spider found in wooded areas across the United States. These spiders get their name from the star-shaped markings on their abdomens. They are relatively small, typically only reaching about a quarter of an inch in length.

Star-bellied orb weavers are black or brown in color, with white or yellow markings on their abdomens. These spiders build a classic wheel-shaped web for catching prey. Their diet consists mainly of insects, although they will also occasionally consume smaller spiders.

7. Shamrock Spider

Shamrock spider
Shamrock spider | image by Yankech gary via Flickr | CC BY-ND 2.0

Scientific Name: Araneus trifolium

The shamrock spider is often found in forested areas across the United States. These spiders get their name from the shamrock-shaped markings on their abdomens. They are relatively small, typically only reaching about a quarter of an inch in length.

Shamrock spiders are black or brown in color, with white or green markings on their abdomens. These spiders build a classic wheel-shaped web for catching prey. Their diet consists mainly of insects, although they will also occasionally consume smaller spiders.

You may also like:  How to Keep Mosquitoes Away Without Bug Spray (10 Ways)

8. Furrow Orbweavers

Furrow orbweaver
Furrow orbweaver on its web | image by Mark Nenadov via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Larinioides cornutus

The Furrow spider is a hunting spider commonly found in gardens and fields across the United States. These spiders are brown or black in color, with markings that help them blend in with their surroundings. They are relatively small, typically only reaching about half an inch in length.

Furrow spiders are active hunters, preying on small insects and other spiders. They do not build webs to catch prey but instead chase down their victims, using their quick reflexes to capture them. These spiders are not considered to be dangerous to humans, but their bites can be painful.

9. The Arrowhead Spider

Arrowhead spider on its web
Arrowhead spider on its web | image by Katja Schulz via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Verrucosa arenata

The Arrowhead Spider is a species found in the tropical rainforests of Central, North, and South America. It gets its name from its body’s shape, which resembles the head of an arrow.

The Arrowhead Spider is a member of the hunting spider family, and it preys on small insects and reptiles. They are brown or black with two rows of eyes and are not considered to be dangerous to humans, but its bite can be painful.

10. Leaf-Curling Sac Spider

Leaf-curling sac spider
Leaf-curling sac spider | image by Steve Kerr via iNaturalist | CC BY 4.0

Scientific Name: Clubiona

The leaf curling sac spider is a tiny arachnid found throughout Minnesota, especially in wooded areas. This spider is a member of the Sac Spider family, and it gets its name from the leaf-shaped cocoon in which it builds its web, often at the edge of ponds or streams.

The leaf curling sac spider is a light brown or tan color, and it has two rows of eyes, each with six eyes. The spider’s body is only about a quarter of an inch long, but its legs can span up to half an inch.

11. Grass Spider

Grass spider on white
Grass spider on white | image by Andrey Zharkikh via Flickr | CC BY 2.0

Scientific Name: Agelenopsis

The Grass spiders are often found in gardens, fields, and other open areas across the United States. These spiders are brown or black in color, with markings that help them blend in with their surroundings. They are relatively small, typically only reaching about half an inch in length.

Grass spiders build webs that are horizontal and have a funnel shape. The web is used to catch prey, which consists mainly of insects. Grass spiders are not considered to be dangerous to humans, but their bites can be painful.