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8 Common Spiders in Tennessee (Pictures)

Tennessee is a beautiful state with a diverse environment that includes forests, mountains, and rivers. This variety of ecosystems provides spiders with plenty of places to live and hunt for food. For example, the Appalachian Mountains are home to many different species of spiders, including the black widow and brown recluse. These common spiders thrive in rocky terrain and are often found near water sources, where they can build webs and catch prey.

Meanwhile, the forests of Tennessee provide ideal habitat for web-building spiders such as the orb weaver. These spiders spin their webs between trees and understory vegetation, where they can capture flying insects.

8 Common Spiders in Tennessee

There are many different types of spiders that you can find in Tennessee. Some are common, while others are rare. This article will discuss some of the most common spiders in the state.

These include the black widow spider, the brown recluse spider, and the southern house spider. We will also provide information on how to identify these spiders and what to do if you encounter one:

1. Orb-weaver Spider

Spotted orbweaver
Spotted orbweaver | image by Judy Gallagher via Flickr | CC BY 2.0
  • Scientific Name: Araneidae
  • Threat Level: Low.
  • Family: Araneidae

Orb-weaver spiders are a type of spider that is known for the circular webs they build. These spiders are found all over the world, and they come in a variety of colors and sizes.

The common orb-weaver spider builds its web in open fields and gardens. These spiders are not aggressive, and they will not bite humans unless they feel threatened.

Orb-weaver spiders are beneficial to have around because they help to control the insect population. These spiders typically eat flying insects such as mosquitoes and moths.

If you find an orb-weaver spider in your home, it is best to leave it be. These spiders pose no threat to humans or pets, and they can actually help keep your home free of pests.

2. Cellar Spiders

Long bodied cellar spider
Long-bodied Cellar Spider | image by Judy Gallagher via Flickr | CC BY 2.0
  • Scientific Name: Pholcus phalangioides
  • Threat Level: Very low. Just creepy.
  • Family: Pholcidae

Also known as daddy long legs, cellar spiders are common in Tennessee. These spiders get their name from the fact that they are often found in cellars and basements. Cellar spiders are long and thin, with legs that can be twice the length of their bodies.

These spiders are not harmful to humans and help control the population of other pests, such as flies and cockroaches. If you find a cellar spider in your home, there is no need to be alarmed. They are just nuisance spiders that are more likely to give you a fright than anything else.

3. Brown Recluse

Brown recluse on a rock
Brown recluse on a rock | image by Johnny BlueJacket via Flickr | CC BY-ND 2.0
  • Scientific Name: Loxosceles reclusa
  • Threat Level: High. Their bites are necrotic.
  • Family: Sicariidae

The brown recluse spider has earned itself quite a reputation. These spiders are often feared because they can cause serious harm to humans.

The brown recluse is a tiny spider with a body about the size of a dime. These spiders are brown in color and have a violin-shaped mark on their backs. Brown recluse spiders aren’t all bad.

However, their bites can cause serious problems for humans. These spiders are venomous, and their bites can lead to necrosis (death of tissue). If a brown recluse spider bites you, it is essential to seek medical help immediately.

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4. Jumping Spiders

jumping spider macro
Jumping spider macro
  • Scientific Name: Salticidae
  • Threat Level: Low. Their bites are infrequent but can be pretty painful.
  • Family: Salticidae

The Jumping spiders are small to medium-sized spiders with long legs. The cephalothorax and abdomen are roughly the same size.

Jumping spiders have excellent eyesight and can jump several times their own body length. Some of these spiders have been recorded to jump up to 25 times their body height.

They prefer warm, dry areas throughout Tennessee and can be found in various habitats, such as gardens, houses, and even caves. Jumping spiders are not aggressive and will not bite. When they see humans, they often flee instead of biting.

5. Zipper Spiders

Black and yellow garden spider
Black and yellow garden spider | Image by Cornell Frühauf from Pixabay
  • Scientific Name: Argiope aurantia
  • Threat Level: Quite low.
  • Family: Araneidae

Zipper spiders are large, colorful spiders commonly found in gardens and fields. They get their name from the zigzag pattern on their abdomen.

These spiders are not aggressive and usually only bite if they feel threatened. Their bites are not venomous to humans but can be painful.

These spiders build large, intricate webs and are often found in open areas. Zipper spiders are beneficial to have around as they help control the population of harmful insects. If you see one of these spiders in your home, there is no need to be alarmed as they pose no threat to you or your family.

6. Southern Black Widows

Southern black widow on its web
Southern black widow on its web | Image by Marcelo Souza from Pixabay
  • Scientific Name: Latrodectus mactans
  • Threat Level: Very high. Painful bites are associated with very serious symptoms.
  • Family: Theridiidae

The southern black widow is one of the most dangerous spiders in North America. They are found throughout the southeastern United States, including Tennessee.

These spiders are small, only about half an inch long. They are black with a distinct red hourglass shape on their abdomen. Females are much more dangerous than males, as they have larger venom glands.

Black widow bites are very painful and can cause severe symptoms, including muscle cramps, nausea, and difficulty breathing. If a black widow bites you, it is vital to seek medical attention immediately.

These spiders are usually found in dark, sheltered areas such as woodpiles or under rocks. They build small, irregular webs and are most active at night. If you are working in an area where black widows may be present, it is essential to wear gloves and long-sleeved shirts to protect yourself.

7. Wolf Spiders

wolf spider close shot
Wolf spider | image by Jean and Fred Hort via Flickr | CC BY 2.0
  • Scientific Name: Lycosidae
  • Threat Level: Medium. These spiders are just creepy, and their bites are painful.
  • Family: Lycosidae
  • Habitat: These spiders can be found in wooded areas, fields, and gardens.

The Wolf spiders are one of the most common spiders in Tennessee. They are creepy, and their bites are painful, but they are not considered dangerous to humans. Wolf spiders can be found in wooded areas, fields, and gardens.

Wolf spiders get their name from their hunting style. They will chase down their prey rather than build webs to trap them. Wolf spiders are also unique in that they carry their egg sacs with them.

If you see a wolf spider in your home, there is no need to panic. They are not considered dangerous to humans and only bite if they feel threatened. If you do get bitten by a wolf spider, the best course of action is to wash the area with soap and water and apply a cold compress.

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8. American House Spiders

American house spider on its web
American house spider on its web | image by u278 via Flickr
  • Scientific Name: Parasteatoda tepidariorum
  • Threat Level: Very low. Their bite wounds are only itchy and not painful.
  • Family: Theridiidae
  • Habitat: These spiders can be found in homes, basements, and other dark places.

The American house spiders are one of the most common spiders in Tennessee. They are not considered dangerous to humans and will only bite if they feel threatened.

You can find American House Spiders in homes, basements, and other dark places where they create their webs. These spiders typically eat insects that become tangled in their web. If you have American House Spiders in your home, there is no need to be concerned as they pose no threat to humans or pets.